Saturday, July 04, 2015

Seven Fashion Trends for Women of the Early 1900’s


The women in The Covington Chronicles dressed in the fashion of the day. Researching the clothing of the first decade of the twentieth century, I discovered these style elements:

Broad-Brimmed Hats. In the early part of the decade, ladies wore hats with pheasant feathers and bird’s nests. The most expensive hats had stuffed male hummingbirds included in the decorations. Toward the end of the decade, hat brims became narrow and droopy.

Women’s Flashy Shoes. Women wore narrow shoes with pointed toes and medium high heels. Patent leather shoes with laces, straps, or pearl buttons were in vogue.

Mary Jane Shoes. Centuries ago men wore buckled shoes similar to the ones we now call Mary Janes. Buster Brown, a comic strip first published in 1902, popularized a character named Mary Jane, who wore strap-and-buckle shoes. Mary Janes became popular among young girls. Some adult shoes followed the same style.

Lingerie Dresses. “Adorned with embroidery, lace, pin tucks, ruffles and ribbons,” * ‘ lingerie dresses appeared on fashionable women at parties, horse races, and other socials.

White Blouses. Women loved blouses with lace and tucks. The style was fullness over the bust. One style with fullness over the bust and a slim waist was called a pigeon blouse

Trumpet Skirts. In the first decade of the twentieth century, skirts that were tight across the hips and flared toward the hem dominated women’s fashions. Skirts similar to these are still popular.

Paul Poiret Fashions. Paul Poiret, the King of Fashions, lived in Paris. In the early 1900’s up until World War I, he dominated the fashion industry. He designed dresses that were the forerunners of modern styles. His dresses were simple, steam lined, and bright colored.

Sources:
Wikipedia, 1900’s in Fashion
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1900s_in_fashion#Hairstyles_and_hats

Wikipedia, Mary Jane (shoes)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Jane_(shoe)

Fashion Source Book
http://trendsupplier.blogspot.com/2010/09/trumpet-skirt-style-has-always-been.html

*On Pins and Needles
http://pinsndls.com/2012/01/21/1900-1910-the-reign-of-the-lingerie-dress/

My three novels set in this time period: